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A small black bear was seen on Oh Dear trail yesterday.  Make noise to avoid surprising him at close range and leave him an escape route.

For more information on wildlife safety go to http://www.wildsafebc.comsniffing bear

Thanks to the Fernie Women on Wheels for a great group bike ride andIMG_8210 all the interest in learning about preventing wildlife /human conflict.  Glad to hear that you enjoyed the opportunity to practice using bear spray with inert spray of course.

If you missed the ride and presentation check out this video https://vimeo.com/123217603 on the Wildsafebc Elk Valley Page

A grizzly bear was reported by Whispering Winds mobile home park yesterday afternoon.

The safest wildlife encounter is one prevented. Your best defense is to be aware of wildlife in the area.

Make Noise to avoid a surprise encounter (use your   human voice, clap hands or two rocks together – especially near running water or in dense brush)

  • Carry a walking stick (adults can carry Bear Spray in a side holster)
  • Walk in groups
  • Keep dogs leashed and/or under voice control

     If you encounter a Bear:

STAY CALM

  • DO NOT RUN
  • Let the bear know you are human (arms out to side)
  • Use your voice in a calm, assertive manner.
  • Back away slowly and allow the bear an escape route
  • Never turn your back on wildlife
  • Do not approach or feed wildlife

Report human/wildlife conflict to 1-877-952-7277orange lawn sign west fernie

Tuesday July 28.  Mt Proctor trails are reopened.  Trails were closed due to cougar activity.  Be prepared and expect to encounter wildlife anytime.

Fernie is Wildlife Country

The Safest Wildlife Encounter is One Prevented

Avoid surprise encounters: Call out, clap your hands, sing or talk loudly

Look for signs of wildlife: Tracks, droppings, diggings, claw-marked trees, torn-up logs, overturned rocks and food caches.

Travel smart: Stay in groups, stay on marked trails and travel in daylight.

Do not litter: Pack it in, pack it out.

Carry bear spray:  Keep it accessible and know how to use it as your last best defense.

Dog owners:  keep your dogs under control.  They may provoke defensive behavior in wildlife.

Cyclists:  speed and quietness put you at risk for sudden encounters.  Slow down and make noise.

Never Approach or Feed Wildlife

If you encounter a Bear:

  • STAY CALM
  • DO NOT RUN
  • Let the bear know you are human (arms out to side)
  • Use your voice in a calm, assertive manner.
  • Back away slowly and allow the bear an escape route
  • Never turn your back on wildlife
  • Do not approach or feed wildlife

If you encounter a Cougar:

  • STAY CALM, DO NOT RUN, MAINTAIN EYE CONTACT
  • Pick up small children and small pets
  • Let the Cougar know you are human-NOT prey
  • Make yourself as large and as mean as possible
  • Use your voice in a loud and assertive manner
  • Back away slowly. Never turn your back on wildlife
  • If the Cougar attacks, fight back with everything that you’ve got, it is a predatory attack

Never Approach or Feed Wildlife

Report human/wildlife conflict to 1-877-952-7277(RAPP) or #7277 on cell.

For more information on preventing human/wildlife conflict visit http://www.wildsafebc.com

 

 Wildlife-Trailhead-poster

Cougars reported following hikers and approaching mountain bikers on Fairy Creek and Swine flu trails in Fernie over the weekend.  Trails have been closed until further notice.

COUGAR SAFETY TIPScougar kit by meg2 

*Be Aware of the wildlife in the area

*Make noise to avoid a surprise encounter (use your human voice)

*Walk in groups

*Carry a walking stick (adults can carry Bear Spray deterrent in a side holster)

*Keep dogs leashed

 

If you encounter a Cougar:

 

*STAY CALM

*DO NOT RUN

*MAINTAIN EYE CONTACT

*Pick up small children and small pets

*LET the Cougar know you are human-NOT prey

*Make yourself as large and as mean as possible

*Use your voice in a loud and assertive manner

*Back away slowly. Never turn your back on wildlife

*If the Cougar attacks, fight back with everything that you’ve got, it is a predatory attack

*Never approach or feed wildlife

 

Report Sightings to 1-877-952-7277 or #7277 on cell

For more information on wildlife safety go to http://www.wildsafebc.com

Friday July 10th.   A grizzly and cub were seen on Lazy Lizard yesterday and a cougar has been seen behind Juniper Lodge on Timberline Crescent at F.A.R.

The WildSfafeBC Elk Valley Coordinator will be away until July 26 in remote locations with no internet or phone.  Please post wildlife sightings on the WildSafeBC Elk Valley Facebook page to share info with others.  Please report human/wildlife conflict or wildlife emergencies to 1-877-952-7277, the 24 hour Conservation Officer Hotline.

Be prepared and expect to encounter wildlife anytime.

For more information on preventing human/wildlife contact go to http://www.wildsafebc.com

Wednesday July 8, 8:30 am.  A mountain biker just reported seeing a black bear sow and cub half way up Stove Trail.  We have chosen to live and play in Bear Country.  Be prepared and expect to encounter wildlife anytime, any place, especially on trails as wildlife will also choose the path of least resistance to get around.and look for food.

For more information on wildlife safety go to http://www.wildsafebc.com

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